10% Human

 In May 2018 I will be installing work for the Science Rendezvous, Toronto!
An iteration of Wonderlandish.
This version of Wonderlandish will be comprised of glass sculptures depicting Human interactions with various flora and fauna microbiota. Entering into Wonderlandish visitors will see artistic renderings of scientific data depicting life-size versions of the organisms mentioned above. A live, VR component will allow visitors to interact with microbiota on display.
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Spirillum Bacteria Cells of a marine spirillum bacteria stained with Cyber Green and viewed at 1,000x magnification under a light microscope. Courtesy of http://www.biology101.org

Users are depicted as their microbial self

Users interact with other microbial organisms; plant, animal, air pollution, etc.

We are literally writhing with microbes. The air is full of microbes- good and bad.

The concept is to bring the invisible into view. What we mediate or cannot see and what we cannot hear.

I imagine the experience as very organic.   All of it makes me consider how connected we are with our environment yet, how human beings* seemingly strive to distance themselves from this reality. So much so that we are now in peril of destroying the shared environment.

I conjecture that since we are apparently *only 10% human (what does that even mean?) That we are transferring and transforming microbial clouds. Perhaps held together by frequencies on a sub atomic level, in order to experience this existence (life) the Human aspect has chosen to mediate these layers of reality…?

“Image courtesy of the Lewis Lab at Northeastern University. Image created by Anthony D’Onofrio, William H. Fowle, Eric J. Stewart and Kim Lewis.”

I am working with artist/musician, Andrei Gravelle. Senior technical manager of Tiff Bell Lightbox.

Game developer, Chris Tihor of Ironic Iconic Studios 

and various scientists towards visual representations of various microbiota.

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A natural community of bacteria growing on a single grain of sand. The sand was collected from intertidal sediment on a beach near Boston, MA in September 2008 and imaged using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).  “Image courtesy of the Lewis Lab at Northeastern University. Image created by Anthony D’Onofrio, William H. Fowle, Eric J. Stewart & Kim Lewis.”

 

 

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